Photos from the new Tellus Museum

The new Tellus Northwest Georgia Science Museum is now open – and we’ve been there!  It’s well worth the short drive (45 minutes for us) north from metro Atlanta.  Despite having been open less than a week, the Tellus was amazingly well-staffed and ready to roll!  (The narrator for the planetarium show was a little too folksy for my taste: your experience may vary.)  Here are a few pics:

Here’s the entrance to the brand spanking new 120K+ sq ft facility in Cartersville, GA:

Here's the entrance to the brand spanking new 120K+ sq ft facility in Cartersville, GA

We were greeted by friendly, enthusiastic employees in the airy, well-lit lobby:

We were greeted by friendly, enthusiastic employees in the airy, well-lit lobby.

They have a Foucault’s Pendulum in the lobby, which demonstrates the rotation of the earth:

They have a Foucault's Pendulum in the lobby, which demonstrates the rotation of the earth.

David and John in front of the full-size apatosaurus display in the Great Hall:

David and John in front of the full-size apatosaurus display in the Great Hall.

Another view of the very cool apatosaurus.

Another view of the very cool apatosaurus.

Line of folks waiting to see the new digital planetarium.  The projected image seemed a bit pixellated to us, and the narrator was too folksy for my taste (too may folktales and not enough science, IMHO), but it certainly shows promise.  When the new telescope is installed, they’ll be able to pipe the video into the planetarium for easy viewing!

Line of folks waiting to see the new digital planetarium.  The projected image seemed a bit pixellated to us, and the narrator was too folksy for my taste (too may folktales and not enough science, IMHO), but it certainly shows promise.  When the new telescope is installed, they'll be able to pipe the video into the planetarium for easy viewing!

On to the Weinman Mineral Gallery, a collection from the Weinman Mineral Museum, which predates the Tellus and forms a considerable part of the museum’s core:

On to the Weinman Mineral Gallery, a collection from the Weinman Mineral Museum, which predates the Tellus and forms a considerable part of the museum's core.

The Weinman gallery features hundreds of specimens, including this amethyst geode, which is four feet tall anyway:

The Weinman gallery features hundreds of specimens, including this amethyst geode, which is four feet tall anyway.

Here’s David with a gorgeous slab of petrified wood.  David’s the one on the left:

Here's David with a gorgeous slab of petrified wood.  David's the one on the left.

Lots of great mineral samples, including precious gems, a sphere of polished obsidian more than a foot in diameter, and samples of gold from around the world:

Lots of great mineral samples, including precious gems, a sphere of polished obsidian more than a foot in diameter, and samples of gold from around the world.

The Fossil Gallery is by far the coolest part of the Tellus.  Their displays include a full-size T-Rex and a dozen other megafauna!

The Fossil Gallery is by far the coolest part of the Tellus.  Their displays include a full-size T-Rex and a dozen other megafauna!

Look – actual science!  Take that, Creation Museum!

Look - actual science!  Take that, Creation Museum!

Their impressive gallery of ancient sea creatures includes this gigantic turtle, a mosasaur, and a plesiosaur:

Their impressive gallery of ancient sea creatures includes this gigantic turtle, a mosasaur, and a plesiosaur.

John and David pose for the requisite photo with the Jaws of Death.  Somebody get Spielberg on the horn:

 John and David pose for the requisite photo with the Jaws of Death.  Somebody get Spielberg on the horn.

On to the Science in Motion Gallery, a nice collection of transportation artifacts, including a replica of the original Wright flyer, several rare vintage cars, classic airplanes, and space vehicles:

On to the Science in Motion Gallery, a nice collection of transportation artifacts, including a replica of the original Wright flyer, several rare vintage cars, classic airplanes, and space vehicles.

One of the few remaining EV1’s, the electric car featured in the documentary Who Killed the Electric Car?

One of the few remaining EV1's, the electric car featured in the documentary Who Killed the Electric Car?

Their space-related artifacts include the Apollo 11 mock-up from the HBO miniseries, a replica of Sputnik, and an authentic capsule used to send up plants and animals in the 60’s:

Their space-related artifacts include the Apollo 11 mock-up from the HBO miniseries, a replica of Sputnik, and an authentic capsule used to send up plants and animals in the 60's.

There’s even an area for the kiddies where they can “dig” for fossils:

There's even an area for the kiddies where they can "dig" for fossils.

While at the Tellus, we met full-time astronomer David Dundee, who is very excited about his new job and salivating at the prospect of driving his new telescope when it gets installed in a few weeks:

While at the Tellus, we met full-time astronomer David Dundee, who is very excited about his new job and salivating at the prospect of driving his new telescope when it gets installed in a few weeks.

And that’s it!  (The highlights, at least – I took a shitload of pictures.)  Overall, very, very cool and off to a great start.  We’ll be back, that’s for certain!

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